Space Station Spacewalk Ended Early for Malfunction

Outside the International Space Station, a spacewalk by Expedition 36 Flight Engineers Chris Cassidy of NASA and Luca Parmitano of the European Space Agency was cut short July 16 after Parmitano reported a buildup of water in the helmet of his U.S. spacesuit. The spacewalk, which lasted only 1 hour and 32 minutes, was the second by the duo in as many weeks, designed to continue rigging cables for the future arrival of a Russian laboratory module and to conduct other maintenance work. The two spacewalkers completed only one task each before the excursion was ordered to end early. Parmitano was never in any danger and none of the tasks scheduled on the spacewalk were considered urgent or time-critical. It was the sixth spacewalk in Cassidy’s career and the second for Parmitano.

25 thoughts on “Space Station Spacewalk Ended Early for Malfunction”

  1. *DROWNING IN OUTER SPACE*

    True story from a spacewalk earlier this year:

    *… As I move back along my route towards the airlock, I become more and
    more certain that the water is increasing. I feel it covering the sponge on
    my earphones and I wonder whether I’ll lose audio contact. The water has
    also almost completely covered the front of my visor, sticking to it and
    obscuring my vision. I realise that to get over one of the antennae on my
    route I will have to move my body into a vertical position, also in order
    for my safety cable to rewind normally.*

    *At that moment, as I turn ‘upside-down’, two things happen: the Sun sets,
    and my ability to see – already compromised by the water – completely
    vanishes, making my eyes useless; but worse than that, the water covers my
    nose – a really awful sensation that I make worse by my vain attempts to
    move the water by shaking my head.*

    *By now, the upper part of the helmet is full of water and I can’t even be
    sure that the next time I breathe I will fill my lungs with air and not
    liquid. To make matters worse, I realise that I can’t even understand which
    direction I should head in to get back to the airlock. I can’t see more
    than a few centimetres in front of me, not even enough to make out the
    handles we use to move around the Station.*

    *I try to contact Chris and Shane: I listen as they talk to each other, but
    their voices are very faint now: I can hardly hear them and they can’t hear
    me. I’m alone. I frantically think of a plan. It’s vital that I get inside
    as quickly as possible. I know that if I stay where I am, Chris will come
    and get me, but how much time do I have? It’s impossible to know.*

    Blind, unable to hear, and alone, Luca Parmitano still managed to figure
    out a solution to get himself back to the airlock. You can watch a movie
    of it here!

    Later, NASA blandly reported:

    *The water was not an immediate health hazard for Parmitano, but Mission
    Control decided to end the spacewalk early.*

  2. *DROWNING IN OUTER SPACE*

    True story from a spacewalk earlier this year:

    *… As I move back along my route towards the airlock, I become more and
    more certain that the water is increasing. I feel it covering the sponge on
    my earphones and I wonder whether I’ll lose audio contact. The water has
    also almost completely covered the front of my visor, sticking to it and
    obscuring my vision. I realise that to get over one of the antennae on my
    route I will have to move my body into a vertical position, also in order
    for my safety cable to rewind normally.*

    *At that moment, as I turn ‘upside-down’, two things happen: the Sun sets,
    and my ability to see – already compromised by the water – completely
    vanishes, making my eyes useless; but worse than that, the water covers my
    nose – a really awful sensation that I make worse by my vain attempts to
    move the water by shaking my head.*

    *By now, the upper part of the helmet is full of water and I can’t even be
    sure that the next time I breathe I will fill my lungs with air and not
    liquid. To make matters worse, I realise that I can’t even understand which
    direction I should head in to get back to the airlock. I can’t see more
    than a few centimetres in front of me, not even enough to make out the
    handles we use to move around the Station.*

    *I try to contact Chris and Shane: I listen as they talk to each other, but
    their voices are very faint now: I can hardly hear them and they can’t hear
    me. I’m alone. I frantically think of a plan. It’s vital that I get inside
    as quickly as possible. I know that if I stay where I am, Chris will come
    and get me, but how much time do I have? It’s impossible to know.*

    Blind, unable to hear, and alone, Luca Parmitano still managed to figure
    out a solution to get himself back to the airlock. You can watch a movie
    of it here!

    Later, NASA blandly reported:

    *The water was not an immediate health hazard for Parmitano, but Mission
    Control decided to end the spacewalk early.*

  3. *DROWNING IN OUTER SPACE*

    True story from a spacewalk earlier this year:

    *… As I move back along my route towards the airlock, I become more and
    more certain that the water is increasing. I feel it covering the sponge on
    my earphones and I wonder whether I’ll lose audio contact. The water has
    also almost completely covered the front of my visor, sticking to it and
    obscuring my vision. I realise that to get over one of the antennae on my
    route I will have to move my body into a vertical position, also in order
    for my safety cable to rewind normally.*

    *At that moment, as I turn ‘upside-down’, two things happen: the Sun sets,
    and my ability to see – already compromised by the water – completely
    vanishes, making my eyes useless; but worse than that, the water covers my
    nose – a really awful sensation that I make worse by my vain attempts to
    move the water by shaking my head.*

    *By now, the upper part of the helmet is full of water and I can’t even be
    sure that the next time I breathe I will fill my lungs with air and not
    liquid. To make matters worse, I realise that I can’t even understand which
    direction I should head in to get back to the airlock. I can’t see more
    than a few centimetres in front of me, not even enough to make out the
    handles we use to move around the Station.*

    *I try to contact Chris and Shane: I listen as they talk to each other, but
    their voices are very faint now: I can hardly hear them and they can’t hear
    me. I’m alone. I frantically think of a plan. It’s vital that I get inside
    as quickly as possible. I know that if I stay where I am, Chris will come
    and get me, but how much time do I have? It’s impossible to know.*

    Blind, unable to hear, and alone, Luca Parmitano still managed to figure
    out a solution to get himself back to the airlock. You can watch a movie
    of it here!

    Later, NASA blandly reported:

    *The water was not an immediate health hazard for Parmitano, but Mission
    Control decided to end the spacewalk early.*

  4. *DROWNING IN OUTER SPACE*

    True story from a spacewalk earlier this year:

    *… As I move back along my route towards the airlock, I become more and
    more certain that the water is increasing. I feel it covering the sponge on
    my earphones and I wonder whether I’ll lose audio contact. The water has
    also almost completely covered the front of my visor, sticking to it and
    obscuring my vision. I realise that to get over one of the antennae on my
    route I will have to move my body into a vertical position, also in order
    for my safety cable to rewind normally.*

    *At that moment, as I turn ‘upside-down’, two things happen: the Sun sets,
    and my ability to see – already compromised by the water – completely
    vanishes, making my eyes useless; but worse than that, the water covers my
    nose – a really awful sensation that I make worse by my vain attempts to
    move the water by shaking my head.*

    *By now, the upper part of the helmet is full of water and I can’t even be
    sure that the next time I breathe I will fill my lungs with air and not
    liquid. To make matters worse, I realise that I can’t even understand which
    direction I should head in to get back to the airlock. I can’t see more
    than a few centimetres in front of me, not even enough to make out the
    handles we use to move around the Station.*

    *I try to contact Chris and Shane: I listen as they talk to each other, but
    their voices are very faint now: I can hardly hear them and they can’t hear
    me. I’m alone. I frantically think of a plan. It’s vital that I get inside
    as quickly as possible. I know that if I stay where I am, Chris will come
    and get me, but how much time do I have? It’s impossible to know.*

    Blind, unable to hear, and alone, Luca Parmitano still managed to figure
    out a solution to get himself back to the airlock. You can watch a movie
    of it here!

    Later, NASA blandly reported:

    *The water was not an immediate health hazard for Parmitano, but Mission
    Control decided to end the spacewalk early.*

  5. *DROWNING IN OUTER SPACE*

    True story from a spacewalk earlier this year:

    *… As I move back along my route towards the airlock, I become more and
    more certain that the water is increasing. I feel it covering the sponge on
    my earphones and I wonder whether I’ll lose audio contact. The water has
    also almost completely covered the front of my visor, sticking to it and
    obscuring my vision. I realise that to get over one of the antennae on my
    route I will have to move my body into a vertical position, also in order
    for my safety cable to rewind normally.*

    *At that moment, as I turn ‘upside-down’, two things happen: the Sun sets,
    and my ability to see – already compromised by the water – completely
    vanishes, making my eyes useless; but worse than that, the water covers my
    nose – a really awful sensation that I make worse by my vain attempts to
    move the water by shaking my head.*

    *By now, the upper part of the helmet is full of water and I can’t even be
    sure that the next time I breathe I will fill my lungs with air and not
    liquid. To make matters worse, I realise that I can’t even understand which
    direction I should head in to get back to the airlock. I can’t see more
    than a few centimetres in front of me, not even enough to make out the
    handles we use to move around the Station.*

    *I try to contact Chris and Shane: I listen as they talk to each other, but
    their voices are very faint now: I can hardly hear them and they can’t hear
    me. I’m alone. I frantically think of a plan. It’s vital that I get inside
    as quickly as possible. I know that if I stay where I am, Chris will come
    and get me, but how much time do I have? It’s impossible to know.*

    Blind, unable to hear, and alone, Luca Parmitano still managed to figure
    out a solution to get himself back to the airlock. You can watch a movie
    of it here!

    Later, NASA blandly reported:

    *The water was not an immediate health hazard for Parmitano, but Mission
    Control decided to end the spacewalk early.*

  6. *DROWNING IN OUTER SPACE*

    True story from a spacewalk earlier this year:

    *… As I move back along my route towards the airlock, I become more and
    more certain that the water is increasing. I feel it covering the sponge on
    my earphones and I wonder whether I’ll lose audio contact. The water has
    also almost completely covered the front of my visor, sticking to it and
    obscuring my vision. I realise that to get over one of the antennae on my
    route I will have to move my body into a vertical position, also in order
    for my safety cable to rewind normally.*

    *At that moment, as I turn ‘upside-down’, two things happen: the Sun sets,
    and my ability to see – already compromised by the water – completely
    vanishes, making my eyes useless; but worse than that, the water covers my
    nose – a really awful sensation that I make worse by my vain attempts to
    move the water by shaking my head.*

    *By now, the upper part of the helmet is full of water and I can’t even be
    sure that the next time I breathe I will fill my lungs with air and not
    liquid. To make matters worse, I realise that I can’t even understand which
    direction I should head in to get back to the airlock. I can’t see more
    than a few centimetres in front of me, not even enough to make out the
    handles we use to move around the Station.*

    *I try to contact Chris and Shane: I listen as they talk to each other, but
    their voices are very faint now: I can hardly hear them and they can’t hear
    me. I’m alone. I frantically think of a plan. It’s vital that I get inside
    as quickly as possible. I know that if I stay where I am, Chris will come
    and get me, but how much time do I have? It’s impossible to know.*

    Blind, unable to hear, and alone, Luca Parmitano still managed to figure
    out a solution to get himself back to the airlock. You can watch a movie
    of it here!

    Later, NASA blandly reported:

    *The water was not an immediate health hazard for Parmitano, but Mission
    Control decided to end the spacewalk early.*

  7. *DROWNING IN OUTER SPACE*

    True story from a spacewalk earlier this year:

    *… As I move back along my route towards the airlock, I become more and
    more certain that the water is increasing. I feel it covering the sponge on
    my earphones and I wonder whether I’ll lose audio contact. The water has
    also almost completely covered the front of my visor, sticking to it and
    obscuring my vision. I realise that to get over one of the antennae on my
    route I will have to move my body into a vertical position, also in order
    for my safety cable to rewind normally.*

    *At that moment, as I turn ‘upside-down’, two things happen: the Sun sets,
    and my ability to see – already compromised by the water – completely
    vanishes, making my eyes useless; but worse than that, the water covers my
    nose – a really awful sensation that I make worse by my vain attempts to
    move the water by shaking my head.*

    *By now, the upper part of the helmet is full of water and I can’t even be
    sure that the next time I breathe I will fill my lungs with air and not
    liquid. To make matters worse, I realise that I can’t even understand which
    direction I should head in to get back to the airlock. I can’t see more
    than a few centimetres in front of me, not even enough to make out the
    handles we use to move around the Station.*

    *I try to contact Chris and Shane: I listen as they talk to each other, but
    their voices are very faint now: I can hardly hear them and they can’t hear
    me. I’m alone. I frantically think of a plan. It’s vital that I get inside
    as quickly as possible. I know that if I stay where I am, Chris will come
    and get me, but how much time do I have? It’s impossible to know.*

    Blind, unable to hear, and alone, Luca Parmitano still managed to figure
    out a solution to get himself back to the airlock. You can watch a movie
    of it here!

    Later, NASA blandly reported:

    *The water was not an immediate health hazard for Parmitano, but Mission
    Control decided to end the spacewalk early.*

  8. *DROWNING IN OUTER SPACE*

    True story from a spacewalk earlier this year:

    *… As I move back along my route towards the airlock, I become more and
    more certain that the water is increasing. I feel it covering the sponge on
    my earphones and I wonder whether I’ll lose audio contact. The water has
    also almost completely covered the front of my visor, sticking to it and
    obscuring my vision. I realise that to get over one of the antennae on my
    route I will have to move my body into a vertical position, also in order
    for my safety cable to rewind normally.*

    *At that moment, as I turn ‘upside-down’, two things happen: the Sun sets,
    and my ability to see – already compromised by the water – completely
    vanishes, making my eyes useless; but worse than that, the water covers my
    nose – a really awful sensation that I make worse by my vain attempts to
    move the water by shaking my head.*

    *By now, the upper part of the helmet is full of water and I can’t even be
    sure that the next time I breathe I will fill my lungs with air and not
    liquid. To make matters worse, I realise that I can’t even understand which
    direction I should head in to get back to the airlock. I can’t see more
    than a few centimetres in front of me, not even enough to make out the
    handles we use to move around the Station.*

    *I try to contact Chris and Shane: I listen as they talk to each other, but
    their voices are very faint now: I can hardly hear them and they can’t hear
    me. I’m alone. I frantically think of a plan. It’s vital that I get inside
    as quickly as possible. I know that if I stay where I am, Chris will come
    and get me, but how much time do I have? It’s impossible to know.*

    Blind, unable to hear, and alone, Luca Parmitano still managed to figure
    out a solution to get himself back to the airlock. You can watch a movie
    of it here!

    Later, NASA blandly reported:

    *The water was not an immediate health hazard for Parmitano, but Mission
    Control decided to end the spacewalk early.*

  9. *DROWNING IN OUTER SPACE*

    True story from a spacewalk earlier this year:

    *… As I move back along my route towards the airlock, I become more and
    more certain that the water is increasing. I feel it covering the sponge on
    my earphones and I wonder whether I’ll lose audio contact. The water has
    also almost completely covered the front of my visor, sticking to it and
    obscuring my vision. I realise that to get over one of the antennae on my
    route I will have to move my body into a vertical position, also in order
    for my safety cable to rewind normally.*

    *At that moment, as I turn ‘upside-down’, two things happen: the Sun sets,
    and my ability to see – already compromised by the water – completely
    vanishes, making my eyes useless; but worse than that, the water covers my
    nose – a really awful sensation that I make worse by my vain attempts to
    move the water by shaking my head.*

    *By now, the upper part of the helmet is full of water and I can’t even be
    sure that the next time I breathe I will fill my lungs with air and not
    liquid. To make matters worse, I realise that I can’t even understand which
    direction I should head in to get back to the airlock. I can’t see more
    than a few centimetres in front of me, not even enough to make out the
    handles we use to move around the Station.*

    *I try to contact Chris and Shane: I listen as they talk to each other, but
    their voices are very faint now: I can hardly hear them and they can’t hear
    me. I’m alone. I frantically think of a plan. It’s vital that I get inside
    as quickly as possible. I know that if I stay where I am, Chris will come
    and get me, but how much time do I have? It’s impossible to know.*

    Blind, unable to hear, and alone, Luca Parmitano still managed to figure
    out a solution to get himself back to the airlock. You can watch a movie
    of it here!

    Later, NASA blandly reported:

    *The water was not an immediate health hazard for Parmitano, but Mission
    Control decided to end the spacewalk early.*

  10. It’s funny how all close up shots are crystal clear and you mask all the
    other video sources. All your cameras that show any hint of black space
    always seem to be shot with crappy cameras. Maybe you should send them out
    to install some HD cameras. What do you not want us to see? 

  11. *DROWNING IN OUTER SPACE*

    True story from a spacewalk earlier this year:

    *… As I move back along my route towards the airlock, I become more and
    more certain that the water is increasing. I feel it covering the sponge on
    my earphones and I wonder whether I’ll lose audio contact. The water has
    also almost completely covered the front of my visor, sticking to it and
    obscuring my vision. I realise that to get over one of the antennae on my
    route I will have to move my body into a vertical position, also in order
    for my safety cable to rewind normally.*

    *At that moment, as I turn ‘upside-down’, two things happen: the Sun sets,
    and my ability to see – already compromised by the water – completely
    vanishes, making my eyes useless; but worse than that, the water covers my
    nose – a really awful sensation that I make worse by my vain attempts to
    move the water by shaking my head.*

    *By now, the upper part of the helmet is full of water and I can’t even be
    sure that the next time I breathe I will fill my lungs with air and not
    liquid. To make matters worse, I realise that I can’t even understand which
    direction I should head in to get back to the airlock. I can’t see more
    than a few centimetres in front of me, not even enough to make out the
    handles we use to move around the Station.*

    *I try to contact Chris and Shane: I listen as they talk to each other, but
    their voices are very faint now: I can hardly hear them and they can’t hear
    me. I’m alone. I frantically think of a plan. It’s vital that I get inside
    as quickly as possible. I know that if I stay where I am, Chris will come
    and get me, but how much time do I have? It’s impossible to know.*

    Blind, unable to hear, and alone, Luca Parmitano still managed to figure
    out a solution to get himself back to the airlock. You can watch a movie
    of it here!

    Later, NASA blandly reported:

    *The water was not an immediate health hazard for Parmitano, but Mission
    Control decided to end the spacewalk early.*

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