Women’s Work: Adapting to climate change in Manus PNG

In Manus Province as with other coastal provinces climate impacts are already being felt. Rising seas and changes in weather patterns have meant that people have had to adapt the way they manage their natural resources.

Women play a vital conservation role in these communities. Much of the economy in Manus is subsistence based and women are primarily responsible for food gardens and collecting inshore food such as mud crabs, clams and mangrove shells. Recently, inshore fisheries and village gardens have not been producing enough for women to keep food on the table for their families or to sell to pay expenses such as school fees and heath care. Women are at the front line if impacts such as changing weather patterns and salt water intrusion decrease the amount of food they can grow and sell. As a consequence, women in communities in North-west Manus are demonstrating the benefits of actively managing these resources through a community network. Through rehabilitating mangroves, temporary marine closures and atoll gardens they are managing resources not only for today but for their children to benefit in years to come.